Prosciutto di Parma e fichi – Prosciutto di Parma and figs in the USA

Prosciutto di Parma e fichi, in the background peperoni ed accughe – Silviadc

Prosciutto di Parma e fichi – Prosciutto di Parma and figs in the USA

Prosciutto di Parma is a DOP product – Denominazione di Origine Protetta = Protected Origin Denomination.

Prosciutto di Parma is sold in many grocery stores and supermarkets in the USA. It’s also available online for delivery everywhere in North America.

The branding guarantees that the prosciutto is the real one. It’s illegal worldwide to make and sell a product with the same name if not the original one.

Prosciutto di Parma brand

Parma is a town in the heart of Emilia-Romagna. They make prosciutto using an age-old tradition passed on from generation to generation. Prosciutto di Parma dates back thousands of years to Roman times. In 100 BCE, Cato, the “Censor,” first mentioned the extraordinary taste of the air-cured ham made around the town of Parma. To make their prized meat last longer, villagers would hang it up to dry, covering it in salt and oil to prevent spoilage.

Producers must follow strict legal guidelines to make this variety of prosciutto. They are closely monitored by the Consorzio di Prosciutto di Parma. The time-honored methods are 100% natural: no additives, just sea salt, air, and time.

Ingredients

  • Prosciutto di Parma
  • Figs
  • Balsamic vinegar

How to make Prosciutto di Parma e fichi – Prosciutto di Parma and figs in the USA

Cut the figs in two halves.

Put the prosciutto and the figs on a serving plate.

Sprinkle with the balsamic vinegar and serve.

Prosciutto di Parma e fichi – Prosciutto di Parma and figs in the USA is a recipe from Emilia Romagna made in the USA

Risotto alle erbe con prosciutto di Parma – Saffron Risotto with Parma Ham, Asparagus and Parmesan

Risotto alle erbe con prosciutto di Parma – Saffron Risotto with Parma Ham, Asparagus and Parmesan

Ingredients – Serves 4

  • Generous pinch of saffron strands
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 350g (12oz) risotto rice
  • 1 bunch spring onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 150ml (1/4 pint) Italian dry white wine
  • 150g (6oz) fine asparagus or fine green beans, sliced
  • 1 litre (1 3/4 pints) hot vegetable stock
  • 6 tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 8 slices Parma Ham, torn in half
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

How to make Risotto alle erbe con prosciutto di Parma

Put the saffron strands into a measuring jug and add 150ml (1/4 pint) of boiling water. Leave to infuse for 10 minutes.
Heat the olive oil in a large deep frying pan or saucepan. Add the rice and cook over low heat for 2-3 minutes, stirring all the time until it looks translucent but not brown. Add the spring onions and garlic. Cook gently for another minute, stirring frequently.
Pour in the white wine and let it bubble up for a few moments. Add the saffron and its soaking liquid, the asparagus or green beans, and a couple of ladlefuls of hot stock. Stir well, then cook over medium heat for 20-25 minutes, gradually adding the remaining stock a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender
Add the grated Parmesan and Parma Ham, stirring them through. Season to taste with salt and pepper, then serve

Cook’s tip: For best results, use Italian arborio or carnaroli rice for a deliciously creamy result.

Risotto alle erbe con prosciutto di Parma – Saffron Risotto with Parma Ham, Asparagus and Parmesan is a regional recipe from Emilia Romagna

Castagnole (dolce) – Chestnuts (sweet)

Castagnole, a Carnival sweet. – Massimo Telò CC BY-SA 3.0

Castagnole (dolce) – Chestnuts (sweet)

Castagnole or favette are a carnival sweet spread throughout Italy; it is part of the culinary tradition of Liguria, Emilia-Romagna, Marche, Lazio, southern Umbria (with the variant called “strufoli di carnevale” in northern Umbria), Abruzzo, Veneto, Lombardy.

History
The recipe for castagnole is certainly ancient: a manuscript volume dating back to the 18th century has been found in the state archives of Viterbo in which four recipes for castagnole are described, one of which requires baking, which was not adopted recently to make the dessert lighter, as is often believed.

Preparation
The main ingredients are eggs, sugar, flour, and butter; after kneading them form small balls the size of a walnut is then fried in hot oil. They are served with powdered sugar or, in some variants, with alchermes or honey.
There are many types: one without filling and another with a custard or cream filling. Another variant is made with flour, yeast, eggs with rum, and liqueur (alchermes) to become balls like a sponge cake because the dough becomes softer inside. Another variant includes a chocolate filling also made of white chocolate. Finally, another variant is the one that provides for baking.

Castagnole (dolce) – Chestnuts (sweet) is a Regional Recipe from Abruzzo, Lazio, Liguria, Marche, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto

Enrico Massetti was born in Milan, Italy.
Now he lives in Washington, DC, USA.
Still, he regularly visits his hometown
and enjoys going around all the places in his home country
especially those he can reach by public transportation.

Enrico loves writing guide books on travel in Italy
to help his friends that go to Italy to visit
and enjoy his old home country.
He also publishes books on the Argentine tango dance.

You can reach Enrico at enricomassetti@msn.com.