Fritto Misto – Mixed fried foods – Made in the USA

The final result os Fritto Misto made in the USA – Silviadc.

Many fish varieties usually included in a typical Italian Fritto Misto, especially shellfish, are not readily available in the USA. However, you can have a fritto misto without these ingredients. The images below illustrate the preparation of such a stir fry Fritto Misto made in Washington DC.

Zucchini blossoms from the Farmer’s market – Silviadc.

Ingredients

  • 6 zucchini blossoms
  • zucchini
  • calamari
  • eggplants
  • flour
  • milk
  • 6 eggs, beaten
  • 1 glass of white wine
  • butter
  • olive oil
  • salt
Calamari cleaned, ready to be fried- Silviadc.

How to make Fritto Misto – Mixed fried foods – Made in the USA

Cut zucchini and eggplant into thick strips. Keep the zucchini blossoms and mushroom caps whole. Dip each piece into the beaten eggs, pat the food to get rid of excess flour, and set aside.

Zucchini blossoms are frying – Siviadc.

Fry each of the food separately, as they require different cooking times. When golden brown on both sides, remove from frying pan and place on paper towels.

For calamari and squid, use just flour.

How to make the Fried Zucchini Flowers

Mix the flour with two spoons of oil, white wine, egg yolk, salt, and pepper.

Add as much lukewarm water as needed to make a smooth batter that is not too thick. set aside to rest for half an hour. Meanwhile, clean the flowers, remove the pistil and stems. Whip the egg white and gently incorporate it into the batter. Dip the flowers in the batter, drain them and fry them in a large frying pan with plenty of hot oil. With the help of the perforated paddle, remove the fried flowers, dry them on absorbent paper, salt and serve immediately.

When all the frying is finished, arrange the various pieces of food on a serving platter. Salt to taste. Serve very hot.

Speed is of utmost importance in a fritto misto, and the amount will vary according to the number of people to be served. A good rule of thumb is always to use one piece of each kind of food for each person. Remember, for speed’s sake; you can also limit the types of food to include in fritto misto. The recipe can also vary according to seasonal food availability.

Leave Ben The Cat sleeping in the bedroom: he can be dangerous in the kitchen!

Pomodori e mozzarella – Mozzarella and tomatoes in the USA

A serving of Mozzarella and Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • Tomatoes
  • Mozzarella di Bufala della Campania
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil

How to make Pomodori e mozzarella – Mozzarella and tomatoes

The preparation is very simple, easy, and strathforward.

Slice the tomatoes in thick slices.

Put them on a plate, with a slice of mozzarella di bufala on top.

Dress with extra virgin olive oil and serve.

The shape of the tomatoes from the Farmer’s market can be irregular: it’s how they taste that counts!

What do you need to make a perfect Pomodori e mozzarella

  • 1 – the tomatoes are better if they come from the farmer’s market. The tomatoes available in most USA supermarkets have been grown for their look, not for how they taste.
  • 2 – make sure that the mozzarella di bufala comes from the Campania region of Italy: there is a sale of mozzarella produced in the South American Andes in many supermarkets. While it’s not bad at all, it’s not the same. You cannot compare the two. For example, three supermarket chains sell South American buffalo mozzarella in the DC area where I live. Only one specialty store (that I am aware of) sells the real Buffalo mozzarella from Campania: Rodman’s.
  • 3 – Use ONLY extra virgin olive oil. The quality of the oil is paramount to the success of this simple dish. The better is the oil, the better the dish. As you can see from the picture, I used “Antichi Uliveti del Prato,” a specialty extra virgin olive oil produced in Sardinia by a small farm. It is available in North America online from Gustiamo.com. Its exquisite taste enhances the dish, but any excellent extra virgin olive oil would be acceptable.
Campaia Bufalo – Stephen Sommerhalter CC BY 3.0

Mozzarella di bufala della Campania : Why?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Buffalo mozzarella (Italian: mozzarella di bufala; Neapolitan: muzzarella ‘e vufera) is a mozzarella made from the milk of Italian Mediterranean buffalo. It is a dairy product traditionally manufactured in Campania, especially in the provinces of Caserta and Salerno.

The term mozzarella derives from the procedure called mozzare, which means “cutting by hand,” separating from the curd, and serving in individual pieces, that is, the process of separation of the curd into small balls. It is appreciated for its versatility and elastic texture and is often called “the queen of the Mediterranean cuisine,” “white gold,” or “the pearl of the table.”

The buffalo mozzarella sold as Mozzarella di Bufala Campana has been granted the status of Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC – “Controlled designation of origin”) since 1993. Since 1996 it is also protected under the EU’s Protected Designation of Origin or DOP Denominazione di Origine Protetta scheme. The protected origin’s appellation requires that it may only be produced with a traditional recipe in select locations in the regions of Campania, Lazio, Apulia, and Molise.

Mozzarella di Bufala della Campania – Popo le Chien CC BY-SA 3.0

History in Italy

The history of water buffalo in Italy is not settled. One theory is that Asian water buffalo were brought to Italy by Goths during the migrations of the early medieval period. However, according to the Consorzio per la Tutela del Formaggio Mozzarella di Bufala Campana, the “most likely hypothesis” is that Normans introduced them from Sicily in 1000 and that Arabs had introduced them into Sicily. The Consorzio per la Tutela also refers to fossil evidence (the prehistoric European Water Buffalo, Bubalus murrensis) suggesting that water buffalo may have originated in Italy. A fourth theory is that water buffalo were brought from Mesopotamia into the Near East by Arabs and then introduced into Europe by pilgrims and returning crusaders.

“In ancient times, the buffalo was a familiar sight in the countryside, since it was widely used as a draught animal in plowing compact and watery terrains, both because of its strength and the size of its hooves, which do not sink too deeply into moist soils.”

References to cheese products made from water buffalo milk appeared for the first time at the beginning of the twelfth century. Buffalo mozzarella became widespread throughout the south of Italy from the second half of the eighteenth century, before which it had been produced only in small quantities.

Production in and around Naples was briefly interrupted during World War II when retreating German troops slaughtered the area’s water buffalo herds. They recommenced a few years after the armistice was signed.

Sciatt

Sciatt Caldi su Letto di Rucola. Piatto della Valtellina. – FakirNL CC BY-SA 3.0

Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.

Ingredienti

Dosi per 4 persone:

  • 300 g di farina di grano saraceno
  • 200 g di farina grano tenero tipo 00
  • 300 g di formaggio Casera (giovane, non stagionato)
  • 1 bicchierino di grappa (non essenziale)
  • birra (fondamentale: è il segreto dell’impasto che si gonfia come un Krapfen)
  • olio per friggere
  • un pizzico di lievito

Luogo d’origine

Ponte in Valtellina, Valtellina, Lombardia

Gli sciatt sono un piatto di anripasto tipico della Valtellina.

L’interno

Letteralmente sciatt in dialetto valtellinese vuol dire rospo. Gli sciatt sono però delle frittelline croccanti di forma tondeggiante con cuore di formaggio fuso, solitamente servite su letto di cicoria. Originariamente, gli sciatt erano tipici solo del paese di Ponte in Valtellina, oggi vengono considerati una specialità dell’intera valle.

Sciatt Caldi su Letto di Rucola. Piatto della Valtellina. – FakirNL CC BY-SA 3.0

Come preparare gli Sciatt

Una miscela di farina di grano saraceno e farina bianca viene impastata con birra, acqua, un pizzico di lievito o bicarbonato e un goccio di grappa fino adottenere un composto (pastella) non troppo liquido, nel quale verrà immerso il formaggio Casera (giovane non stagionato) tagliato a cubetti.

Dopo aver scaldato l’olio alla temperatura di frittura, in una pentola capiente, l’impasto viene calato nell’olio a piccole porzioni, mediante l’uso di un cucchiaio grande, avendo cura di raccogliere un cubetto di casera per ogni sciatt. Tolti dall’olio quando ben dorati, vanno serviti direttamente nel piatto con cicoria cruda, tagliata sottilmente e condita con olio, aceto e sale, perché siano consumati appena fatti. La temperatura dell’olio che frigge blocca l’impasto liquido in forme curiose, a volte con strane somiglianze ai ranocchi: da questo il nome di “rospi” o, in dialetto, sciatt. Poiché calare nell’olio il cucchiaio con l’impasto e il dadino di formaggio all’interno (se resta all’esterno cola fuori!) è un’operazione che richiede abilità, a volte si può usare un cucchiaio emisferico speciale. Gli sciatt allora vengono rotondi o comunque più regolari.

Roulade of Prosciutto San Daniele and Witloof chicory

Ingredients for 5 people

5 Witloof chicories (Belgian endives)
10 slices of Prosciutto San Daniele
400 g of fontina cheese thinly sliced
butter as required

How to make Roulade of Prosciutto San Daniele and Witloof chicory

Take five firm white Witloof chicories and boil them whole in salted water. When they are cooked, cut them lengthwise and place them on a cloth to dry. When dry, wrap each chicory half in a slice of Prosciutto San Daniele. Lightly grease a baking dish with butter Place the rolls in the baking dish and sprinkle them with the thinly sliced fontina. Place the baking dish briefly under the grill to melt the cheese. Then, you can place it in the oven until a kind of gratin is obtained. Serve immediately.

Regional recipe from Veneto

Crocchè – Crocchette – Neapolitan Croquettes

Crocchè – Crocchette – Flickr.com user “deramaenrama” CC BY 2.0

From Wikibooks, free manuals, and textbooks.
Crocchè (from French croquettes) is a typical dish of Neapolitan cooking made of potatoes and eggs fried after being breaded in breadcrumbs.
It is a specialty also spread in Sicily and Palermo, particularly a city where milk is used instead of eggs and mint is used. It should also be specified that this version is a product of simpler preparation, although equally tasty.
In Naples, they are often called panzarotti, whereas, in Palermo, they are called cazzilli.
They can also be made with mashed potatoes treated in the same way. In Piedmont, this version is called Subric.

Ingredients for the Neapolitan Crocchè

For the dough
potatoes
eggs
grated parmesan cheese
fior of milk
parsley
pepper (abundant)
salt to taste

For the ripasso

Beaten egg white.
Breadcrumbs to taste.

How to make Crocchè – Crocchette – Neapolitan Croquettes

Wash the potatoes and boil them in abundant salted water for about 40 minutes.
Drain them, peel them, pass them through a sieve, add whole eggs (1 or 2 depending on the quantity), grated Parmesan cheese, chopped parsley, salt, and plenty of pepper, then mix well.
Collect with one hand 80/100 gr. of dough and rub it between the hands until obtaining cylinders of about 7/8 cm in length and 3/4 in diameter. With that, make a long niche in the cylinder and place a thin strip of fior di latte, close carefully, and then pass, first in the white of egg then in breadcrumbs.
Fry them immersed (no more than two at a time) in plenty of oil or lard until golden, drain and dry on paper towels/paper towels, serve hot.

ITALIANO

Da Wikibooks, manuali e libri di testo liberi.
I crocchè (dal francese croquettes) sono un piatto tipico della cucina napoletana a base di patate ed uova, che vengono fritte dopo essere impanate in pan grattato.
Si tratta di una specialità diffusa anche in Sicilia ed a Palermo in particolare, città in cui si utilizza il latte anziché le uova ed è presente la mentuccia. Occorre anche specificare che in questa versione si tratta di un prodotto di più semplice preparazione anche se altrettanto gustoso.
A Napoli prendono spesso anche il nome di panzarotti, a Palermo vengono invece chiamate cazzilli.
Possono essere realizzate anche con la purea di patate trattata nello stesso modo. In Piemonte questa versione viene chiamata Subric.

Ingredienti per il Crocchè Napoletano

Per l’impasto:

patate
uova
parmigiano grattugiato
fior di latte
prezzemolo
pepe (abbondante)
sale q.b.

Per il ripasso

Bianco d’uovo sbattuto.
Pangrattato quanto basta.

Preparazione

  1. Lavate le patate e fatele bollire in abbondante acqua salata per circa 40 minuti.
  2. Scolatele, pelatele e passatele al setaccio, unendo uova intere (1 o 2 a seconda delle quantità), parmigiano grattugiato, prezzemolo tritato, sale ed abbondante pepe quindi impastare bene il tutto.
  3. Raccogliere con una mano 80/100 gr. di impasto e sfregarlo tra le mani fino ad ottenere dei cilindri di circa 7/8 cm di lunghezza e 3/4 di diametro, ricavare una nicchia lunga nel cilindro e deporvi una sottile strisciolina di fior di latte, richiudere accuratamente e quindi passare, prima nel bianco d’uovo poi nel pangrattato.
  4. Friggerli immersi (non più di due alla volta) in abbondate olio o strutto fino a doratura, scolare ed asciugare su carta assorbente/cartapaglia, servire caldissimi.

Regional Recipe from Campania, Sicily, and Piedmont

Rosa di Gorizia – Rose of Gorica

Rosa di Gorizia – Rose of Gorica – Cate sherpa Public Domain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
The Rose of Gorizia is a local variety of radicchio (Cichorium intybus of the subspecies sativum) typical of the area of Gorizia in Friuli-Venezia Giulia. It is recognized as one of the Traditional Agri-foodstuffs of Friuli and Venezia Giulia and as a Slow Food Presidium.

Description

Rosa di Gorizia is a variety of chicory characterized by an intense red color or red color with nuances leading to pink according to the type of selection. Leaves are broad and arranged in the shape of an open rose. The taste is only slightly bitter, as opposed to Veneto (radicchio from Castelfranco, Chioggia, Treviso, Verona), and it is crunchy to the palate. The variety of Rosa di Gorizia with a more delicate taste is called “Canarino” and is probably obtained by a cross with Trieste’s blond chicory. Finally, the Canary has yellow-colored foliage and an even sweeter taste.

Historical notes

The history of Rose of Gorizia dates back to the times of Hapsburgs. The first written sources appeared in the volume “Gorizia – la Nizza austriaca” of 1873, written by Baron Carl von Czoernig-Czernhausen, who lived in Gorizia in the second half of 1800. In the volume, among the description of legumes cultivated in the city, a “reddish chicory” is produced in the plain between Gorizia and Salcano and, to a lesser extent, in the city’s peripheral areas.
Rosa di Gorizia had great importance for the city’s economy, mainly based on agriculture, and relied a lot on producing this particular chicory. Older farmers of the area remember they always made it because it was one of the few and sure sources of income during the cold winter season in Gorizia.
The origin of the Rose in the territory of Gorizia refers to a Mr. Vida. She escaped a plague epidemic that broke out in Veneto by bringing the seeds with him to Gorizia. Thus, Vida could have transported seeds of red radicchio from Veneto, or perhaps those of Chioggia, which once sown in the lands of Gorizia, would have given origin to the Rose of Gorizia.
Another hypothesis dates back to the origin of the seeds to the countess of Gorizia, Leukardis, from 1046 to 1072 abbess of Castel Badia’s monastery where the nuns practiced in the cultivation of flowers and vegetables, which, because of the harsh climate, needed particular care. Given the very close relationship between what today are the territories of Val Pusteria and Gorizia, one can imagine that there were frequent exchanges of products between the two places.

Diffusion and use

Rose was cultivated mainly in the plain between Gorizia and Salcano (today in Slovenia); however, the cultivation has been reduced over the years due to the enlargement of urban centers. Therefore, its production is not intensive, which guarantees the product a niche market, making the Rose Italian excellence protected. Today it is sold at very high prices because of the increased need for a workforce. In recent years, the Rose of Gorizia has had absolute commercial growth in the world’s haute cuisine. It is the most expensive radicchio globally, sought after by chefs from all over the world for its beauty and gastronomic peculiarities. Its beauty and perfection in shape, together with the coast’s crunchiness and sweetness, make it the winter period’s special ingredient. It appears in the kitchens of the most famous European and worldwide restaurants, which consider it precious as truffle and therefore worthy of matching with caviar and other precious ingredients. An example of the spreading of the Rose of Gorizia is the Cookitraw event of 2010, which took place on the Collio Goriziano, where 20 chefs worldwide celebrated it in their creations table. Chefs of the caliber of Renè Redzepi, Yoshihiro Narisawa, Massimo Bottura have interpreted it in the various elaborations of the kitchen, showing how it can be used in multiple forms, from cooked to raw, up to the version in extra virgin olive oil, which is also protected and became a Slow Food Presidium.

Radicchio, slightly bitterish, is to be tasted raw, cut as little as possible to avoid oxidation, and accompanied by boiled potatoes, boiled beans, boiled eggs, or seasoned with olive oil, wine vinegar, and salt. Even the tiny root is good to eat, cut thinly, and added to a salad.

How to make Rosa di Gorizia – Rose of Gorica: Production

Rose is sown in the period between March and half June, in the waning moon, which often coincides with the sowing of cereals, particularly oats, to avoid the growth of weeds.
Seeds are mixed with sand (Isonzo sand is preferred) to form a solid mass distributed on the ground. The ideal soil is of alluvial origin, gravelly, and rich in iron, subject, during the summer, to long periods of drought. During summertime, the clods are broken at least twice by harrowing, and we wait for the arrival of the first cold weather. The harvesting of radicchio, done by hand, head by head, with all the roots, occurs from the end of November to the beginning of December, and it begins after the first frosts. At the time of harvesting, the heads of Rosa are almost the same as the heads of common radicchio: the color is green. After harvesting, the charges are kept in closed environments, at a temperature of about ten degrees, gathered in bunches of ten plants each, and laid on straw, grass, or sand. Heads must be wetted, and as they develop, outer leaves must be removed. Forcing ends in the days before Christmas, the period in which radicchio appears on the table.
After the forcing, the selection of seeds also takes place. During the harvesting at the beginning of December, farmers do not collect the roots, but they leave some plants on the ground. The choice of the mother plants is based on personal experiences and sensibility according to each plant’s external aspect. These selections depend on the product’s quality, which is not entirely identical from producer to producer. The color of the finished product varies according to the type of selection made.
When the plant has reached a certain height of growth, about 70 centimeters, farmers strip most of its leaves, allowing wider sprouting. In June, the blue flowers sprout, and the harvesting of the stems begins. Tied in bundles, they are left to dry upside down, and by August, the beating takes place. With this process, the dried flowers containing seeds are removed. The material is first passed through a sieve, the dras, and then, using a special wooden tray, the vintuluza, the remaining impurities are removed; finally, the final cleaning is done. The seed obtained must remain at rest, skip a productive season, and preserve and improve genetics and germinability.

Cultural importance

The Rose is the result of the selections made by the various local families of farmers that followed one another during the centuries. The choice for the production of seeds is carried out by growers in a practical way and follows a long and established tradition, to which growers stick.
In the past, the seeds obtained by these selections were never sold or given to other families. Still, they were jealously kept to keep the patent on the product received, which became a family characteristic. Nowadays, every farmer is very jealous of his seeds, just like the families of the past. However, the declarations produced by some producers who have dedicated themselves to this type of cultivation for more than 25 years are preserved In the form of self-certification. They hand down the seeds from generation to generation, reproducing them from year to year after selecting them.
Protection of the product
The Rose of Gorizia is recognized as a PAT (Prodotto Agroalimentare Tradizionale – Traditional Food Product) of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region. The local producers are gathered in the Producers Association Radicchio Rosso di Gorizia, Rosa di Gorizia and Canarino, established in 2010 to enhance the uniqueness of the product and remember the traditional boundaries of cultivation within the municipality of Gorizia. The city itself has given the Producers Association Rosa di Gorizia e Canarino, the municipal denomination, De.Co., and has entrusted the same to supervise the production discipline’s respect.[unclear] The association has obtained Italian Collective Mark’s certification and is waiting for the recognition as European Collective Mark. This radicchio is considered the most expensive in the world. Being used by chefs of haute cuisine worldwide, it is copied and reproduced in territories outside its borders, with very different cultivation techniques that make it very different from the original. In defense of this product’s originality and quality, the Slow Food Association has taken sides and collaborates to protect this gastronomic specialty.

Regional food from Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Production area Municipality of Gorizia

Zucchine Gratinate – Baked Zucchini with Bread Crumbs

Italian side dishes or “contorni” usually consist of sautéed seasonal greens, salads, or roasted vegetables that go along with the main course. Generally, the vegetables are served after a portion of pasta to help amp up a small serving of grilled or roasted fish or meat. 

Fresh zucchini is in season during the summer and fall, but if they are grown in greenhouses, they’ll be available all year round and can be used in a variety of ways, whether you want to fry them, shred them them into crisp salads, or roast in the oven. The small green zucchini we will use for this recipe are easy to find in any country, but here in Italy, they are known as “zucchine Genovese.” 

When selecting produce in your market or grocery store, make sure to pick the straight, slim, and dark green zucchini instead of the oblong squash-shaped ones; since these will have more seeds and higher water content. Check that the zucchini is not bruised or scraped in any way. Since you do not need to peel them, make sure they are washed and dried correctly before slicing for this recipe. 

The grated cheese and breadcrumb mixture contributes to the flavor and texture combination of this dish. Pay attention to how much salt you need to add to the mix since the grated cheese you use might be salty enough that you do not need to add any more. Taste a pinch of the breadcrumb mixture before breading the zucchini and adjust with salt and pepper if necessary.

Ingredients:

Six small green zucchini cut lengthwise in 1/4-inch slices
1/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 c. breadcrumbs
1/4 c. grated pecorino or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

fresh rosemary, picked from the stem and roughly chopped
zest of 1 lemon
black pepper + sea salt to taste

How to make Zucchine Gratinate – Baked Zucchini with Bread Crumbs:

Thinly slice the zucchini and toss in a big bowl with the extra virgin olive oil. In a separate bowl, prepare the breadcrumbs with the grated cheese, chopped rosemary, lemon zest, freshly cracked pepper, and a sprinkle of sea salt. Coat both sides of the zucchini slices with the breadcrumbs and press the mixture into each piece to form a nice crust. Line a sheet tray with baking paper and coat with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil to prevent the zucchini from sticking to the pan. I prefer to use baking paper instead of aluminum foil since the foil tends to rip more easily when scooping the cooked vegetables off when they are finished. 

Baked Zucchini with Bread Crumbs

Courtesy of mhzchoiceblog.com

Written by Linda Sarris Photos by Luisa Misseri

Italian side dishes or “contorni” usually consist of sautéed seasonal greens, salads, or roasted vegetables that go along with the main course. Generally, the vegetables are served after a portion of pasta to help amp up a small serving of grilled or roasted fish or meat. 

Fresh zucchini is in season during the summer and fall, but if they are grown in greenhouses, they’ll be available all year round and can be used in a variety of ways, whether you want to fry them, shred them them into crisp salads, or roast in the oven. The small green zucchini we will use for this recipe are easy to find in any country, but here in Italy, they are known as “zucchine Genovese.” 

Notes from the Chef:

When selecting produce in your market or grocery store, make sure to pick the straight, slim, and dark green zucchini instead of the oblong squash-shaped ones; since these will have more seeds and higher water content. Check that the zucchini is not bruised or scraped in any way. Since you do not need to peel them, make sure they are washed and dried correctly before slicing for this recipe. 

The grated cheese and breadcrumb mixture contributes to the flavor and texture combination of this dish. Pay attention to how much salt you need to add to the mix since the grated cheese you use might be salty enough that you do not need to add any more. Taste a pinch of the breadcrumb mixture before breading the zucchini and adjust with salt and pepper if necessary.

Ingredients:

Six small green zucchini cut lengthwise in 1/4-inch slices
1/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 c. breadcrumbs
1/4 c. grated pecorino or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
fresh rosemary, picked from the stem and roughly chopped
zest of 1 lemon
black pepper + sea salt to taste

Courtesy of mhzchoiceblog.com

How to make Baked Zucchini with Bread Crumbs

Thinly slice the zucchini and toss in a big bowl with the extra virgin olive oil. In a separate bowl, prepare the breadcrumbs with the grated cheese, chopped rosemary, lemon zest, freshly cracked pepper, and sea salt sprinkle. Coat both sides of the zucchini slices with the breadcrumbs and press the mixture into each piece to form a nice crust. Line a sheet tray with baking paper and coat with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil to prevent the zucchini from sticking to the pan. I prefer to use baking paper instead of aluminum foil since the foil tends to rip more easily when scooping the cooked vegetables off when they are finished.
Lay the breaded zucchini pieces close together on the baking sheet without overlapping. Bake the zucchini in a pre-heated oven at 180°C/350°F for about 10 minutes until the outside is well toasted to a golden brown color and the zucchini is cooked all the way through. Serve right away to preserve their crisp texture. 

Regional Recipe from Basilicata

Fried Zucchini Flowers

Ingredients:

1 zucchini
15 zucchini flowers
1l sunflower oil
1 egg
260ml cold water
200g 00 flour x cakes

How to make the Fried Zucchini Flowers:

Make the batter with water, flour, and 2 tablespoons of an egg.
Stir very gently and let it rest for 15min
Cut and trim vegetables then put zucchini and their flowers in the batter to fray them for 3min.

Melanzane sott’olio – Eggplants in oil

Difficulty: Average Time: 1 day and 30 minutes

Ingredients

2 kg of eggplants;
vinegar;
salt;
olive oil

How to make Melanzane sott’olio

Cut to thin slices the eggplants, salt them and prepare them in a colander for 10 minutes so that they lose some of their water.
Wash them and soak them in the vinegar for 5 minutes.
Squeeze the eggplants, crushing them among two weights; it is advisable to press them very well among two cutting boards.
Leave them for 24 hours.
Cut the garlic into slices and put the eggplants in the pots; inserted some garlic pieces.
In the end, cover with olive oil and preserve it in a fresh and dry, dark place.

Regional Recipe from Sardinia

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