Arvoltolo

Arvoltolo – Cantalamessa CC BY 3.0

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
The Arvoltolo is a fried pizza typical of the Perugia area, widespread in two variants: sweet and salty. It has very ancient origins; it was present in the Umbrian peasant cuisine since the seventeenth century, consumed on holidays, as breakfast or snack. In the area of Orvieto, the arvoltoli take the name of tortucce. They are also called “poltricce”‘ or “frittelle” or “fregnacce,” according to the vernacular of the places of origin; today, they are on the table of the families more tied up to the tradition, in some restaurants of typical kitchen and country festivals.
Ingredients

Recommended servings for 4 people

8 tablespoons of wheat flour
5 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
Water qb.
Salt or sugar to taste
Seed oil for frying

How to make Arvoltolo

Pour flour, water, and oil in a bowl, mixing carefully, avoiding the formation of lumps. From the mixture obtained, cut-out discs, it is advisable to pierce the dough with a fork not to swell. In the meantime, heat the seed oil in a casserole. Fry the disks in the hot oil, one at a time, turning them until golden brown on both sides. Remove from the oil and let them dry on absorbent paper, removing the excess. Sprinkle them with sugar or salt, according to use. They are excellent served hot as an appetizer to be eaten with cold cuts or dessert to eat at the end of the meal.

Events and festivals

The culinary tradition of arvoltolo lives again in the summer period in the characteristic village festivals. In particular, in July, the Tortuccia Festival in Castel Giorgio offers this dish savory, sweet (with sugar or Nutella), and stuffed (with cold cuts or vegetables) versions. Between July and August, the Festival of Wild Boar in Spezzatino, dell’Arvoltolo and typical Umbrian products in Migliano, and September the Festival of Arvoltolo in Olmeto. From August 2018 takes place in the first Palazzo Sagra dell’arvoltolo.

Curiosity

“The name arvoltolo perhaps derives precisely from the need to turn and turn (arvoltare, in Perugia) the batter, to allow cooking on both sides.”

Regional Recipe from Umbria

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Enrico Massetti was born in Milan, Italy.
Now he lives in Washington, DC, USA.
Still, he regularly visits his hometown
and enjoys going around all the places in his home country
especially those he can reach by public transportation.

Enrico loves writing guide books on travel in Italy
to help his friends that go to Italy to visit
and enjoy his old home country.
He also publishes books on the Argentine tango dance.

You can reach Enrico at enricomassetti@msn.com.